The Sound of One Leaf Falling

Here be the link to my latest column at Hilltown Families about poetry for families to learn and (hopefully) love. Enjoy!

a list & an extremely large umbrella

A smart Mom-friend posted a link on Facebook to a post, Things I Want My 10 Year Old Daughter to Know. I followed the link to Huff Post and from there to Lindsey Mead's blog: A Design So Vast. Pokey thinks the list is so spot on she had to share it with you. Follow … Continue reading a list & an extremely large umbrella

honey, let’s have rilke put them to bed tonight

My second One Clover & A Bee column at Hilltown Families is up: Poems to (Possibly) Sleep On, in which I argue for reading poetry aloud as a way to put your kids to sleep. No, not because poetry is BORING, but because a) not everybody loves to hear themselves sing, and b) it means … Continue reading honey, let’s have rilke put them to bed tonight

Detachment Parenting

This morning as I drove along the river that winds through our little town I was noticing how, six months after Tropical Storm Irene swept through, the river’s path is dramatically altered. Shallow, sleepy meanders with the occasional spot deep enough to submerge your body on a hot summer day have been replaced with steep … Continue reading Detachment Parenting

the big poetry giveaway

Kelli Russell Agodon over at Book of Kells has once again jumpstarted an extravaganza of poetry love, the Big Poetry Giveaway. Seeing as it’s April, National Poetry Month, and Fool’s Day is safely over, I thought I’d get on board. This is the deal: leave a comment here with your name and at the end … Continue reading the big poetry giveaway

the birth of pokey, part II

In which Pokey becomes a Master of Regret and encounters Temporary Blindness. My friend Maya describes how she recently came across a photograph of herself at a party when her daughter was an infant. “I was wearing red pants! Red pants! What was I thinking? Who does that?” This, dear reader, is the question of … Continue reading the birth of pokey, part II

no place like home

click.click.click.    In the poetry workshop I taught this fall we talked a lot about repetition and variation. We agreed that repetition can be a good thing in a poem, like an engine moving you forward when you think you might be stuck. It worked for Dorothy: there’s no place like home, there’s no place like … Continue reading no place like home